USC Football: What Washington Means for Colorado

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse


Oct 13, 2012; Seattle, WA, USA; Washington Huskies running back Bishop Sankey (25) is tackled by multiple USC Trojans defensive players during the first half at CenturyLink Field. Mandatory Credit: Steven Bisig-US PRESSWIRE

Against Washington: The USC defense forced two important fumbles and nabbed two interceptions. They held the Huskies to under 300 total yards and just 14 points, while hassling Keith Price with five sacks.

What that means for Colorado: In the most surprising plot twist of the season, the 2012 Trojans can now firmly be defined as a defensive football team. Need proof? Lane Kiffin is now the kind of coach who will run on 3rd and long because he’d rather let the opposing team face his father’s defense, then drop back to pass and risk his quarterback being hit.

USC ranks top 30 nationally in pass efficiency (29), rushing (23), total (25) and scoring defense (27). They rank  fifth in sacks, 16th in tackles for loss, fourth in interceptions, and 12th in total turnovers forced.

In terms of Colorado, it’s very simple. The Buffaloes rank in the top half of the Pac-12 in only one statistical category – punting. 

Use your ← → (arrows) to browse

Tags: Colorado Buffaloes Football USC Trojans Washington Huskies

  • TMS

    Alicia, I just wanted to correct your stats you gave. Not a big deal but they can be misleading if they’re not correct is way off. The correct stats were all updated on Sunday October 14th and posted as official on the NCAA website for all Division 1 FBS teams. You said USC was ranked #25 in total offense. USC did not make the Top 50 in total offense. They’re actually ranked #52. You said Rushing Offense is #23. USC did not make the Top 50 in Rushing Offense. USC is actually ranked #53. Also, USC is actually #31 in passing efficiency. You were correct in Scoring Defense at #31. Fight On!!!